Family Day at the Fort Saint-Jean

With its village, its gardens and its countless secrets, the Fort Saint-Jean is a joyous maze, where we recommend losing yourselves as a family! A historical tour? A scenic walk? A panoramic stroll? The Mucem offers you three free routes for self-guided tours!

Route 1 – Fort of History

Set off for an encounter with knights, soldiers, navigators and kings!

Starting point: Entrance to the Fort Saint-Jean from the Old Port.

[Palestine] Nostalgia and Longing for an Imagined Past

[Palestine] Nostalgia and Longing for an Imagined Past

Rencontre

As a social historian of photography, Issam Nassar has published several books reflecting on questions of modernity and urban life of Jerusalem specifically and Palestine more generally. In this recent project, he medidates critically his own works and the trappings of nostalgia.

 


 

 Issam Nassar is Professor of Middle East History at Illinois State and Modern History at Qatar University. He is the co-editor of Jerusalem Quarterly and author and editor of several books, the most recent being, The Storyteller of Jerusalem: The Life and Times of Wasif Jawharriyeh, 1904-1948, co-edited with Salim Tamari and published in 2014.

 

 

Artiste(s) et collaborateur(s)  : 
Par Issam Nassar (historien)
Prices
Type of audience Tout Public
[Palestine] The White Elephant

[Palestine] The White Elephant

Rencontre

The White Elephant is an experimental video loosely based on the adventures of a Palestinian teenager coming to grips with her angst within the political climate of the Oslo Accords in Palestine in the 1990s. Narrating a story of lies amongst thieves, the confessional and at times darkly humorous video, projects a confrontational gaze onto the landscape through acts that transgress political boundaries and explore personal desires.

 


 

Shuruq Harb is a visual artist, curator and writer based in Ramallah, Palestine. She is the co-founder of a number of independent art initiatives such as of ArtTerritories and The River Has two Banks. 

 

Artiste(s) et collaborateur(s)  : 
Par Shuruq Harb (artiste)
Prices
Type of audience Tout Public
[Palestine] Jerusalem(s), Borderline Syndrome

[Palestine] Jerusalem(s), Borderline Syndrome

For centuries, the city of Jerusalem has been the site of sanctification, religious and ideological projections. It is like a repository of irrational attachments, fetishizing and over-zealous religious observance. Since 1948 it became an icon of the Arab-Israeli war. In this cinematic essay that straddles fiction and documentary, Sivan references the different psychoses that the symbolic over-valuation of the city has inspired, namely he ‘Jerusalem Syndrome’, diagnosed in the 19th century, that afflicted pilgrims and tourists to the Holy City, and a similar psycho-pathology known as the ‘Jerusalem Fever’, diagnosed in the 20th century. Sivan’s camera travels the everyday life of the city, and follows, in parallel, a young boy who wanders the streets at night and discovers a prostitute with golden breasts. He, like the camera, fall victim to a violently effeminized Jerusalem.

Année de réalisation  : 
1994
Artiste(s) et collaborateur(s)  : 
D’Eyal Sivan
Prices
Type of audience Tout Public
Heure 1h05
[Palestine] Palestine: Nothing Makes Sense, Why Should I

[Palestine] Palestine: Nothing Makes Sense, Why Should I

Rencontre

Suad Amiry presents an illustrated reading of excerpts from her books, Sharon and My Mother-in-Law and Nothing to Lose but Your Life: An 18-Hour Trip with Murad, as well as showing images.

 


 

Suad Amiry is a Palestinian writer and architect. Born in Damascus to a Syrian mother and a Palestinian father, she now lives between Ramallah and New York City. She is a founder of Riwaq: Center for Architectural Conservation in Ramallah. She is also the author of acclaimed memoirs, inlcuding Sharon and My Mother-in-Law (2005), Menopausal Palestine: Women at the Edge (2011), Nothing to Lose but Your Life: An 18-Hour Trip with Murad (2011), and Golda Slept Here (2014) and My “Damascus” (2016). Amiry is the recipient of Italy’s renowned literary awards: Viareggio-Versilia (2004) and Nonino Risit D’Aur (2014). She and her organization, Riwaq, also won the presitigious Aga Khan Award for Architecture in 2013.

çu le prestigieux prix Aga Khan pour l’architecture en 2013.

Artiste(s) et collaborateur(s)  : 
Par Suad Amiry (écrivaine et architecte)
Prices
Type of audience Tout Public
[Palestine] Translating Palestine

[Palestine] Translating Palestine

Rencontre

In this conversation, Anton Shammas and Fawwaz Traboulsi, two major intellectuals from the Arab world, will discuss the questions of translation in the Palestinian context of conflict, violence and the experience of mediating across languages.

 


 

Anton Shammas is a Palestinian writer and translator of Arabic, Hebrew and English. He has been teaching Arabic and Comparative Literature at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, since 1997. He is the author of three books of poetry (in Hebrew and Arabic): Poems (Arabic. Jerusalem, 1974), Hardcover (Hebrew. Tel-Aviv, 1974), No Man's Land (Hebrew. Tel-Aviv, 1979); three plays: Ta'ah bil-hayt (A Hole in the Wall), a bilingual play for young adults, in Arabic and Hebrew, "Haifa Theater," 1978-79; Ghassil Wijjak ya Qamar (Wash your Face, Moon - Arabic), for "The Arab Theater," Haifa, 1997; Stuffed Ducks, a play in progress (Hebrew and English), for River Arts, Woodstock, 1989; many essays in English, Hebrew and Arabic; and a novel, Arabesques, originally published in Hebrew (1986) and translated into 8 languages. Upon its American publication in 1988, Arabesques was chosen by The New York Times Book Review as one of the best seven fiction works of 1988.

His essays, on the current cultural and political scene in the Middle East, and on his linguistic autobiography in between three languages, have been published in Harper’s Magazine, The New York Review of Books, and The New York Times Magazine. He has translated from and into Arabic, Hebrew and English, playwrights, writers and poets such as: Samuel Beckett, Harold Pinter, Edward Albee, Athol Fugard, Dario Fo, Emile Habiby, Mahmoud Darwish, and Taha Muhammad Ali.

Fawwaz Traboulsi is visiting professor of Political Science and History at the American University of Beirut. He has been a visiting professor at New York University, the University of Michigan, Columbia University, New York University, and Vienna University. He is a fellow of St. Antony’s College, Oxford, and the Wissenschaftskolleg zu Berlin. His twenty books and numerous lectures, papers and articles have dealt with history, politics, liberation and social movements, political philosophy, memoirs, folklore and art in the Arab World. Traboulsi’s latest translations include Edward Said’s Out of Place (2003) Humanism and Democratic Critique (2005) and On Late Style (2015). He has also published with Aziz al-Azmeh an anthology of Ahmad Fares Shidyaq’a writings (1995). His most recent books are A History of Modern Lebanon (Pluto Press, London 2007, 2012) Hareer wa Hadeed (Silk and Iron, From Mount Lebanon to the Suez Canal, Beirut 2013) and Damm al-Akhawayn, al-‘Unf fi al-Huroob al-Ahliyyah (The Blood of Brothers, On Violence in Civil Wars, 2016). Traboulsi, a long-time journalist, is the editor of the quarterly cultural journal Bidayat, founded in the spring 2012.

Artiste(s) et collaborateur(s)  : 
Anton Shammas and Fawwaz Traboulsi
Prices
Type of audience Tout Public
[Palestine] Mahmoud Darwich - Et la terre, comme langue

[Palestine] Mahmoud Darwich - Et la terre, comme langue

In drawing a filmic portrait of Palestinian poet Mahmoud Darwich, Simone Bitton and Elias Sanbar considered two elements, namely, as Darwich reminds them, that the Arabic word for home, bayt, is also the word for verse. In other words, poems inhabit their listeners and forge belonging. The second element was Darwich’s inimitable rhythm, the cadence of his words and metaphors. The film is more than a biographical portrait, it is an invitation to a travel inside the poet’s universe, the modern, allegorical Andalusia he imagined, humanistic, irreverent and erotic.

 


 

Simone Bitton was born in Morocco in 1955, she lives between Paris, Rabat and Jerusalem. She has directed more than twenty films and documentary series for cinema and television. Bitton’s practice has been very versatile, ranging from archival montage, poetic essay films, intimate portraits of artists, or investigative documentary, but her political engagement with the history, culture and present-day reality of the Middle East and North African regions is salient. The series she directed, Les grandes vois de la Chanson Arabe (1990), and the two-episode films Palestine, the story of a Land (1993) are reference works that have been broadcast several times and distributed in several countries, more than 20 years after their release. The Wall (2004) and Rachel (2009) received several awards and were released in theaters in several countries. Bitton teaches at the University Paris 8, and is a member of the Ateliers Varan.

 

Année de réalisation  : 
1997
Artiste(s) et collaborateur(s)  : 
De Simone Bitton
Prices
Type of audience Tout Public
Heure 59 min
Imagined Cities

Imagined Cities

Rencontre

For her recent project, Jumana Manna researched the Post Herbarium at the American University of Beirut, which archives the biodiversity of Syria, Palestine and Sinai, and was established by the American missionary, botanist and surgeon George E. Post (1838–1909) in the late 19th century. Post, along with scores of European and American scholars and scientists travelled to the Levant with the belief that scientific study of the so-called Bible Land would unlock Christian theology. Bible Dictionaries were quite popular at that time. Some of the specimen in the collection are extinct today due to climate change, real estate development and war, making the herbarium a cemetery of dead and living eco-systems of Lebanon and the region. Manna’s presentation will reflect on the research, and tease out the historical and contemporary repercussions of a gaze lodged between religious imagination and the seemingly rational endeavor of botany.

Artiste(s) et collaborateur(s)  : 
Par Jumana Manna
Prices
Type of audience Tout Public
[Palestine] A Magical Substance Flows into Me

[Palestine] A Magical Substance Flows into Me

Robert Lachmann was a German-Jewish ethnomusicologist who traveled to Palestine in the 1930s and started a radio show titled "Oriental Music", that explored the musical traditions of Palestine and included regular live performances by musicians from different ethnic and religious groups. Inspired by Lachmann’s musicological studies, Palestinian artist Jumana Manna travels through Israel and the Palestinian territories of today with recordings from the program. What do these songs sound like now when performed by Moroccan, Kurdish, or Yemenite Jews, by Samaritans, members of the urban and rural Palestinian communities, Bedouins and Coptic Christians? When a true fascination for history meets the sounds of the rababa, saz, oud and tin cans, a cultural diversity emerges that subverts the distinction between "Arab" and "Jewish". There are no national borders here, only different kitchens where people make music together – with their guests, while cooking, or making the coffee.

 


 

Jumana Manna is a Palestinian visual artist living in Berlin. Weaving together the methods of historian, anthropologist and performer, Manna creates films and sculptures that explore how power is articulated through relationships, focusing on the body and materiality in relation to historical narratives and nationalism. Recent solo exhibitions include venues such as Chisenhale Gallery, London, UK, Beirut Art Center, Beirut, Lebanon and Sculpture Center, New York, USA. Manna has participated in group exhibitions at Kunsthalle Wien, Liverpool Biennial, 20th Biennale of Sydney, Marrakech Biennale 6, The Jerusalem Show VII, Al Ma’mal Foundation, and Henie Onstad Kunstsenter, Bærum. Her films has been screened at festivals and institutions such as M+, Hong Kong, 54th Viennale International Film Festival, 66th Berlinale Forum, Tate Modern, London, Performa13 Biennial, New York, and the 42nd IFFR Rotterdam. Manna was awarded the A.M. Qattan Foundation’s Young Palestinian Artist Award in 2012, and she is the Ars Viva Prize for Visual Arts laureate in 2017.  In 2017 she is developing new commissions for The Nordic Pavillion, Venice Biennale, Satellite Program 10 at Jeu de Paume Paris and CAPC Bordeaux, and The HighLine, New York.

Année de réalisation  : 
2015
Artiste(s) et collaborateur(s)  : 
De Jumana Manna
Prices
Type of audience Tout Public
Heure 1h10
[Palestine] A World Not Ours

[Palestine] A World Not Ours

Blending his family portrait with the chronicles of return, Fleifel’s first feature records the daily survival of three generations of Palestinian refugees living in the Ain el-Helweh camp, just south of Sidon, Lebanon’s second largest city. Drawing on family archives (photos and videos), as well as historical footage, the film is a reflection on belonging, friendship and family. It is not only the story of a family, but an attempt to record what is fleeting, on the brink of falling into forgetting because of collective indifference to the despair of refugees. Fleifel, who had the privilege of leaving the bleak living conditions in the camp, returns to find his friends, with whom he still shares a passion for soccer and Palestinian politics. In the unmediated, yet tender foray into the universe of the camp, A World Not Ours intimates to the viewer the poignant lived experience of being deprived of the most basic of civic rights, over the span of generations.

 


 

Born in Dubai, raised in the Palestinian refugee camp of Ain el-Helweh in south Lebanon, Mahdi Fleifel studied film at the British National Film and Television School. His short films have screened at several international film festivals and earned awards. A World not Ours is his first feature film.

Année de réalisation  : 
2012
Artiste(s) et collaborateur(s)  : 
De Mahdi Fleifel
Prices
Type of audience Tout Public
Heure 1h33
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